Six Smart Women Discussing Doctor Who

VerityEpisode24-300Our countdown of the Doctors has reached it’s antepenultimate entry. Whether you were looking forward to it or not, it’s Jon Pertwee time! Join Deb, Erika, Liz, and Lynne as we discuss the pros and cons of the most dapper of Doctors. We also spend a good amount of time talking about Jo and the Master, and we even manage to detour into UK politics of the 70s. And as usual, there is much friendly disagreement!

^E

Also covered:
Liz is excited about the latest Gallifrey One guest announcement!
Erika is working on an online shop for Verity! tee shirts! (More designs & countries coming soon! Let us know what you want!)
Lynne listened to some Lost Episodes BBC audios: Power of the Daleks! The Highlanders! The Underwater Menace(!)
Deb sparked a great conversation with her article Fangirl Isn’t a Dirty Word!

Bonus links:
Splendid Chaps – Nine/Women (w/Tansy!)
Tansy’s WHO50 blog series
Tansy’s  New Who blogs
Radio Free Skaro classic commentary – The Sea Devils

Download or listen now (runtime 1:11:09) 

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Comments on: "Verity! Episode 24 – Three: Some of Us Like Him" (23)

  1. Ray Adamson said:

    Although i have much affection for this period of Doctor Who because essentially it’s the first Doctor Who i ever knew and it’s quite acclaimed by fandom generally,i really struggle with liking it too much because it was actually about making Doctor Who like The Quatermass Experiment,James Bond or The Avengers.It’s just not genuine Doctor Who because of the radical changes of it’s new format,to me personally.I suppose the best thing about it is that Jon Pertwee’s Doctor is as heroic as the Doctor really gets in the classic series.I agree that his lack of tolerance for anybody who is not as smart as him is less than endearing but his superior attitude is completely consistent with his perpetual frustration about being imprisoned on one primitive planet,in one time period by his own people.He manages but actually he’s really unhappy and i think he just takes it out on the people around him sometimes.It was pretty unavoidable since so many of these stories were set on Earth, that there is a certain amount of current affairs and politics amongst the science fiction and drama,but there’s always great monsters and plenty of action.Incidentally,i don’t think any amount of careful lighting could have made the monsters in eighties Who look good because the likes of the Ergon and the Myrka were desperately rubbish.I think it’s a pity that they never made a story where they examined Jo’s conflicting interests between being a member of U.N.I.T and a friend of the Doctor but i was never in any doubt that her real loyalties were always with the Doctor.Think it was a bit cheeky of Letts to convince Hinchcliffe, Baker and JNT that it was inappropriate to ever imply any possible romantic relationship between the Doctor and his companion when he’d already suggested that himself in The Green Death fairly blatantly.

  2. WeePertOne said:

    There’s nothing wrong with a bit of sarnie snaffling. Why just the other day i saw a beautiful ham and cheese sarnie sat there all alone in a restaurant. It would be a crime to let such a thing go to waste! so with a flurry of my mighty cape i sprang into action rescuing it with considerable risk to my own safety (some nefarious villain had planted a guard in the form of 2 children and a little old lady, but they did not fool me with their shapeshifting abilities, for i am awesome)

  3. Noah Soudrette said:

    This was a tough one to listen too since Jon Pertwee was my first Doctor and I adore him. I can see how his standoffishness could turn some people off but, my god, Doctors like Colin Baker and David Tennant have been way more nasty and down right mean at times.

    Anyway, I wanted to say that I felt two important things were overlooked in the discussion. First, pertaining to the Doctor’s character, you have to remember that at all times he feels trapped like a rat in a cage because of his exile. I feel that its at times almost maddening to him, which he points out to Jo when talking about the Master’s incarceration. He may love humans, but he needs quality Alien Time Traveller time as well. I mean, I love my significant other, but its nice to have some ‘me’ time. And if I don’t get it, I can get tetchy.

    The other thing that I felt needed to be addressed was that, while some don’t like the action adventure/Quatermass turn the show makes during this era, it’s this very change that saves the show from probable cancellation and makes the ratings begin to soar.

    So. Great show as always ladies. There’s my two cents. Keep up the great work!

    • Noah, you make some great points. I do agree that much of the third Doctor’s demeanor was shaped by his imprisonment. (I think I go into more detail about that here: http://fangirlknitsscarf.wordpress.com/2012/03/05/doctor-who-pertwee-more-like-pertweak-part-1/) That said, the reason for it doesn’t make it any more palatable to me. But that’s completely a matter of taste, and I don’t begrudge you or anyone else for loving The Posh One. 🙂 On the contrary, I think it’s great and important that every Doctor is loved deeply by someone, so thank you for picking up my slack!

      And you’re right about turning the show around. Like it or not, the Pertwee era flat out saved the damn thing!

    • while some don’t like the action adventure/Quatermass turn the show

      I *love* that aspect of things. I don’t think they could’ve sustained it for long, if they’d tried to outside s7 and kind of bits of s8 (I think the initial success would wear off since there are like, three plots (aliens invading, mad scientist, aliens already here), as someone once said), but by gum am I glad they did it. Season seven is gloriously good telly. And season 8 is up there too as far as I’m concerned.

  4. The Pertwee Era, in retrospect, was a radical reboot of the series concept, and, as Erika suggested upstream, saved the show.

    That said, I do have a silly affectation for The Time Monster, too. Its daft but I can’t help myself.

  5. jezbez said:

    I think I would class the 6s outfit on Necros as a travelling cloak rather than a cape 😉

    There are times when I’m really into 3 and watch several stories at once but they’re always followed by long periods where I struggle with him. He’s a bit of a leftover from the late 1960’s. Kind of like a faded copy of Adam Adamant Lives!, which had been a faded copy of the Avengers (image search Adam Adamant Lives! and you’ll see what I mean).

    There’s some very good parts of his tenure but some bloated stories and a bit of sameyness.

    Did save the show and introduce both Sarah-Jane the Master though. Very hard for ANY of the other Doctors to match that.

  6. Hope you all got a copy of blue box messiah… But thats not why I am leaving a comment.

    I adore the 3rd =octors era and had planet of spiders on tv with the sound off while listening to your podcast and doing house work. Who said men cant multitax! Any. Way. It was simply fab to be able to hear such a warm and honest view of one of my fave docs… Thanks

    • I know you are all spreadsheeted up with future shows but could I put in a request for a subject… Basically I have a four year old daughter who I am introducing to the show. And I was wondering what stories you would show your kids or more importantly… Which you would avoid.

      Cheers michael

      • Elvisomar said:

        I’d like to second Michael’s request here—this is an excellent topic for your podcast. I say that because those of you with children (three of you if I’ve been paying attention) make mention of the fact that you have them, and discuss your kid’s relationship with the show.

        My daughter is in her teens now, but I still remember those sorts of discussions in my life. Not only was I trying to evaluate what was appropriate for her to enjoy given her maturity and personal taste, it also gave me a vicarious opportunity to see familiar material through the eyes of a young person again. For example, I read my daughter the Hobbit when she was six, and it had so much more of that sense of magic and wonder that Tolkien no doubt intended because I was reading it to her, and seeing it through her eyes as we went.

        I’m generally an advocate that one should not overprotect children. I genuinely believe that all Doctor Who is appropriate for children—above a certain level of maturity, anyway. Scary stories are an important part of exploring the world around us. Still, I can see reserving a story like Inferno until after a child (or person) has build a relationship with the character.

        You might consider expand the boundaries of discussion to make reference to the most accessible story for the various doctors for non-fans of all ages, but I do hope some variation of tindogpodcast Michael’s suggestion is considered for the program.

      • Thanks Michael and Elvisomar! I always like encouragement on this topic because I feel guilty banging on about my kids all the time if there’s no interest in the other end – and I LOVE LOVE talking about the topic of Doctor Who and children because Doctor Who has loomed large in my daughters’ lives. After all, my eldest was born in 2005…

        As it happens, there is a ‘Doctor Who and kids’ item already programmed into Deb’s spreadsheet. So hang tight, it will be coming along one of these days.

        PS: My new update is that my 8 year old has fallen for Victoria thanks to a book about Companions, and I had to break it to her about most of V’s stories being lost. TRAGIC. She is so over her anti black and white bias – recently when it was her turn to choose a Doctor Who DVD to watch with the boys after school she chose the Mind Robber. I HAVE WON THE CULTURE WARS.

      • I agree that this would be great. I love hearing how other parents introduced their kids to Doctor Who, and the different ways kids embrace it.
        My 5 year olds have been watching since age 3. It was the first show they would deign to watch that was not Thomas or Shaun the Sheep.

        And I’ve long since given up on trying to guess which ones are “too scary” for them. The episodes I thought would give them nightmares don’t faze them, and the ones I’d have thought were no sweat, they find terrifying.

      • I grew up with classic Who on VHS from around that age; I wasn’t often really scared, but the things I recall as unsettling me were Sutekh, Kane’s melting face, Revelation, and Resurrection, if that’s any help at all.

  7. I stumbled across this review for the 11 doctors action figure set – it seemed particularly relevant to this episode!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/review/R1LOFW6M7N669P/ref=cm_cr_pr_cmt?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B002YX011E&linkCode=&nodeID=&tag=#wasThisHelpful

  8. Thanks for another lovely and entertaining podcast!

    I find it hard to view Pertwee’s era objectively because his last season was when I first started watching the programme regularly, so just seeing him onscreen is a pure hit of nostalgic glee for me. However, I was very young then (4 years old) and didn’t really fall in love with the programme until Tom Baker came along, so it’s been interesting to catch up with the Pertwee stories as they’ve come out on DVD, and see many of them for the first time. I can see why his rather abrasive demeanor puts some people off, but personally I like the Doctor when he’s a bit irascible, especially with bureaucrats.

  9. The 3rd Doctor is Sexy Knickers! I admit it! BUT, is it really true that the generation of kids who grew up with him enlisted in the military more because of the gadgets he used? The theme of this Doctor was that mindless bureaucracy is foolish and that killing people instead of negotiating for peace is stupid and uncivilized. I daresay, that’s even Jon Pertwee’s message. He was created/regenerated because an over-structured society (from the War Games) wouldn’t follow the spirit of the law as opposed to the letter of it. I can’t see any self respecting kid mindlessly joining the military if they’d paid any attention to what was actually happening on the screen.

    • I feel the UNIT years provided mixed messages about the military. On the one hand you’re right that there are a lot of stories where the main philosophy is ‘mindlessly obeying orders is bad’ and ‘bureaucracy sucks’ but mixed in with that there’s an awful lot of ‘I’d like to go for a beer with the Brig and Benton,’ ‘The Doctor gets to play with cool toys,’ and I do feel the overall take-home message is that if you are a rebellious sciency type with major anti-establishment attitudes then the military is going to be totally open to letting you breeze in and out of their operations at your leisure. And give you an awesome car.

  10. Alicia said:

    Erika, I totally agree with you about the dreadfulness of the soundtrack. It was already bothering me, but then my poor dog came into the room while I was watching and kept tilting his head back and forth trying to identify where the awful, high pitched sounds were coming from so he could make it stop.

    • Heh. It really is something, isn’t it? it’s one of those pieces that completely divides fandom. You and I definitely don’t like it, but there are some folks who find it their absolute favorite. I don’t understand these folks, but I can still find it in my heart to love them. 😉

  11. I really want more quotes on mugs! Especially “on this episode of Verity” and “nuggets of Doctor Who delight that fill us with glee” as well as many others!

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